Archive for November, 2010

23
Nov

VIDEO: David Agus: A new strategy in the war against cancer

Dr. David Agus, a cancer doctor, says that the way we’re tackling cancer in the United States is, well, completely screwed up. He recommends an entirely different approach in a video that appeared at a recent T.E.D. conference. It’s a bit long at 24 minutes, but worth a look. Be prepared to get (re)educated.

TED: Ideas worth spreadingTED (Technology Entertainment and Design) is a global set of conferences curated by the American private non-profit Sapling Foundation, formed to disseminate “ideas worth spreading”.

19
Nov

Hair Is Beautiful

You may have heard of folks who donate ponytails to charity organizations that help people who’ve lost their hair to radiation, chemotherapy, or alopecia. I admire these people, and kudos to you if you’re one of them. But this story, well, it earned my tears. It’s about a cancer survivor, a wonderful friend of mine, blessed both in beating the disease and having her hair grow back, who then donated her lush locks to charity. The whole story can be found on her blog, “Hope. Love, Run.“, but I’ve included a copy here of the letter she wrote to the charity that accompanied her donation. Mazel Tov to Juliana!

09
Nov

Ears ringing, face smiling

I went to sleep last night with my ears ringing and a smile on my face. The ringing ears came from listening to a musician I just met rock out at The Bell House in Brooklyn with his amazing wife and—to my great surprise—my buddy Jon Quinn, the Brooklyn fitness guru who runs Captain Quinn’s Boot Camp. The smile was a consequence of serendipity, wonderful news about Jonah’s battle with melanoma, and the band’s impassioned performance. And there were tears, not at bedtime but earlier in the evening, when a perceived wrong was set right. Before I jump into that, however, I’ve got to tell you about the serendipitous happenings that brought me to the performance.

05
Nov

New York Times: CT scans cut lung cancer rates. Ciao, Cancer: who pays?

The New York Times reported today that a massive, government-funded study has revealed that annual lung CT scans for current and former heavy smokers can result in a 20% reduction in mortality. That’s great news, since there hasn’t been any effective tool for early detection of lung cancer. But there’s something we need to know–or figure out–and that’s who’s going to pay for it?