Posts Tagged ‘cancer research’

05
Nov

New York Times: CT scans cut lung cancer rates. Ciao, Cancer: who pays?

The New York Times reported today that a massive, government-funded study has revealed that annual lung CT scans for current and former heavy smokers can result in a 20% reduction in mortality. That’s great news, since there hasn’t been any effective tool for early detection of lung cancer. But there’s something we need to know–or figure out–and that’s who’s going to pay for it?

02
Sep

The Cancer Beat: Thursday, September 2, 2010

No one used to talk about cancer. It was the C-word, and social restrictions limited discussions to doctors and patients, and patients only with their closest family members. But—and fortunately—times have changed, and now with the world online, news and conversations about cancer are everywhere. The problem today is information overload, and Ciao, Cancer! is going to start filtering it for you, pulling out the gems in a weekly post called, “The Cancer Beat”.

12
Aug

A closer look at a cup of joe: the word on coffee and cancer

Coffee love imageI had just finished my first cup of joe yesterday—a morning ritual of great importance to me—when I stumbled upon a Reuters story that said there was no link between coffee consumption in men and prostate cancer. Coffee, in this case, was vindicated, but I wasn’t aware that it had been a suspect, at least not for several years. A number of recent studies have shown that coffee—and most likely caffeine—has a protective effect against certain types of cancer; others show no association between coffee and a broad range of cancers. Since I consume so much of the stuff, I thought I’d best do a little digging, and I must say that I was pretty surprised by what I learned.

10
Aug

VIDEO: “William Li: Can we eat to starve cancer?”

A 24-minute TED video featuring William Li, director of the Angiogenesis Foundation, on how nutrition can fight cancer.

TED: Ideas worth spreading

TED (Technology Entertainment and Design) is a global set of conferences curated by the American private non-profit Sapling Foundation, formed to disseminate “ideas worth spreading”.


Aug

Killing brain tumors, Star Trek style

If you saw yesterday’s post, “Discovery“, you may recall that I was a bit of a science geek as a teenager. One requirement for this distinction, next to bringing a brick-sized scientific calculator to math class, was to love all things Star Trek–the television series, films, and my die-cast model of the U.S.S. Enterprise. In late November 1986, two-and-a-half months after my brain surgery, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home was released. It had a scene I’ll never forget. Captain Kirk and his crew have traveled back in time to 1986 to stop a massive environmental crisis from occurring. Chekov, unconscious from a head injury, is lying on a table in an operating room and being prepped for surgery. Kirk and his wry chief medical officer, Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy, manage to locate Chekov, and when Bones sees what the doctors are about to do, screams “My God, man, drilling holes in his head is not the answer!”. Having gone through it myself, I couldn’t agree more, but a new approach to attacking brain cancer might—at some point in the future—make surgery obsolete.